Recall

I remember how when we started going to high school, it was all about becoming famous and being liked by everyone. Back when Instagram had only but launched and Facebook was still leading the social media empire. It was all about having more likes on your profile pictures than anyone else.

It was so stupid because once you had reached some kind of fame (which is ridiculous in itself because our population consists of about 3 people)  rumors started. We wanted to be who people talked about but we wanted people to have good opinions about us. Rumors, however are not usually positive and when we heard about how other people thought we were, all we wanted was being left alone.

Back then, Formspring was still a thing and for a year or so it was the hotspot for rumors. People answered questions about other people, spreading lies to restore their own image. Acting and reacting. We knew that lies about us were being told, yet when we heard something about someone else, we didn’t think twice, believed and passed it on.

I don’t know why  people feel the need to be known by everyone. It might just be some sort of transition phase, part of growing up. I think that it’s the result of social pressure, that we put on ourselves. We think that we’re good people when others believe we are. We give others too much control over our self-esteem and self-evaluation. We fear to lose our individuality and want to stand out, have something that others want, do something others can’t.

Now, looking back to this period, I feel like I spent too much time comparing myself to others. While I enjoyed growing up in this society( and still do), I think I could’ve been happier if this comparison hadn’t taken place to this extent.

Uniqueness is wealth. Compare yourself to who you were yesterday, not other people.

Invent yourself, CK


“How much time he gains who does not look to see what his neighbour says or does or thinks, but only at what he does himself, to make it just and holy.” ― Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

nicotine is out

In times of endless possibilities to keep in touch with others, we’ve become more anti-social than ever. We’re slowly becoming a society full of people who live in their phones , rather than using it as a tool. The roles are reversed, phones have started telling their owners what to do. They own people.

The various profiles we created to fake a perfect life, made us so aware of how we’re supposed to present ourselves, to show the best of us in every situation. We’re worried that people will notice that this is not who we are in real life. We’re no longer hiding behind false fronts, we have turned into them.

On the one hand, when we’re in public, we’re looking at our phones, pretending to be really busy, hoping no one looks at us or judges us. As soon as we look up, we see other people avoiding social contact in just the same way, for what?

On the other hand we’re seeking social contact, we’re looking for social interaction. That’s something you can’t find on a phone, yet we replace real, face to face communication with chats. We’re becoming robots, machines, addicted to our phones. While social networks are meant to communicate, we’re losing the ability to actually keep up a real conversation, simply because we’re no longer used to it. An online chat is not an alternative to a real conversation.

We’re bored of reality, we think that we can find real life on the internet and hope to find purpose on our phones, where all we really find are Donald Trump memes. How  do people not realize that phones are keeping them from living? How much more could we do if  we spent this time, looking down at phones, to improve our lives and change the world around us. We’re so keen to find out who we are, who we want to be, yet we waste our time because we’re afraid of real life and would rather be entertained. In my view, exchanging personal growth with entertainment is not too great of a deal.

You’re human, perfection is not an option, accept it. Don’t hide who you are. Put down your phone  and talk to the people you love.

Invent yourself,CK


The more social media we have, the more we think we’re connecting, yet we are really disconnecting from each other. – JR

Lost sight

We live in a world in which it has become important to identify friends in memes and laugh about the Donald Trumps and Kim Kardashians in the world, while we never question the consequences of letting this kind of people have so much influence on our lives.

Viral trends and memes, that are ‘so us’ have taken a place in all of our lives, it’s no more a pastime, it has become an everyday-thing. And while we’re laughing about vines (r.i.p) and the American presidential election, we’re losing track of what’s actually happening around us. We’re staring at our phones, blending out our surroundings and pretend we’re informed about the world, since we read another badly written , uninformed post on Facebook.

We lose so much time, looking through our timelines on social media and ignore the real world, we live in a digital world and come out only  to eat (while publishing photos of what we’re eating of course) and for school, where we still use every free minute to check what’s happening online, meaning that the only time we’re ever not online is while we sleep.

We scroll through timelines and aren’t even interested in most of the posts we see. Why do we still insist on looking at our phones all the time? We’re addicted to being informed, which wouldn’t be a bad thing if that information were of any worth. But most of the time we’re shown altogether uninteresting and boring posts.

We walk through life looking down on our phones. We want to be kept entertained, thinking life around us is unable to do so. We’re losing the ability to live without our phones. When was the last time you didn’t use your phone for a whole day?

I don’t want to defend this lifestyle, yet it’s evident that the governments want us to do just that, because as long as we’re laughing at silly memes, we’re not questioning their politics. We believe we are informed when we’re numb to true information.

Invent yourself,CK

There’s a danger in the internet and social media. The notion that information is enough, that more and more information is enough, that you don’t have to think, you just have to get more information – gets very dangerous. – Edward de Bono